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Do Condoms Protect 100% From Herpes?

Condoms play an important role in the reducing the transmission of sexually transmitted disease or STD like HIV, AIDS and herpes. Although it appears that condoms are generally considered as a birth control method, using condoms are extensively recommended to prevent the spread and transmission herpes simplex virus. Studies shown that using it during sexual intercourse significantly reduce the risk of infection being transmitted. Laboratory results shows that herpes virus do not go through latex condoms. Even if studies shows that condoms are useful prevention for herpes, many people are still asking, Do condoms protect 100% from herpes? The answer in short is no. Although condoms can prevent the spread and transmission of herpes, it cannot be 100% accurate. Herpes simplex virus can be transmitted through skin contact. Condoms cannot guarantee 100% prevention because herpes lesions may occur in areas that is not covered by condoms. They don’t guarantee full safety but it is the most available form of herpes protection. The use of condom during sexual intercourse is decided by both partners. During the intercourse, there is a possibility that the condom will be damaged or even break, in this case, skin contact with the infected area is highly possible. If the infected party is concern about his or her partner, condom can give you a relief but it is not surely safe.

Do condoms protect 100% from herpes? You can just stop asking this question. Condoms will only cover a part of the genitals and infections may be present on the other area not covered by it. Herpes are mostly transmitted by individuals who are not aware that they are infected. Self- awareness is very important. Herpes brings out dynamic changes in a couple’s sex life, such as abstaining from sexual intercourse. Yes, normally, the best way to prevent the spread and transmission of herpes is to avoid any kinds of sexual contact. Avoiding sexual contact when symptoms are present will be a great help since herpes outbreaks occur only about a maximum of three-five times a year. Most couple sees it as a minor inconvenience only. Genital herpes does not automatically mean abstinence from sex. Intimate relationship is still possible even with herpes. Love is the most important thing in a relationship after all.

How Contagious Is Herpes?

When it comes to sexuality, casual kissing and casual sex is quite normal, making the ability to catch a virus like herpes a lot easier to do. Most people don’t even know much about the virus when they get it, if they realize they contracted anything at all. How did you get it? What are some signs that they have this infection? Understanding what the herpes virus is and how you can catch this infection might help you stop the spread of herpes to others. Even if you aren’t showing signs of this disease, that doesn’t necessarily mean that you don’t have it. Read below to find out just how contagious herpes can be and what you can do to halt the spreading of it.

Is herpes contagious? Well, yes; herpes is one of the most contagious diseases out there. It is very easy to spread from one person to the next through any form of skin to skin contact. Most often it is spread from kissing, HSV-2, or oral herpes, is estimated to be present among 80% of the adult US population. Aside from not kissing at all, there’s little you can do to protect yourself on your lips, other than to avoid kissing all together when you see a cold sore present. Even without the sore though, the virus can stay dormat and you can still spread the virus fairly easily.

When it comes to genital herpes, it’s also transmitted by skin to skin contact and it’s estimated that 20-25% of the adult US population have HSV-2. Even with no noticeable signs and the use of latex condoms, passing the virus is still possible. One, condoms don’t always cover the entire penis and asymmetric shedding may occur, which is actually how most genital herpes infections occur. Also, it’s possible to have outbreaks or asymmetric shedding in the testicle area, which leaves your partner completely unprotected while having sex. It’s best to avoid intercourse when you notice any sores, or feel an outbreak is coming on. It’s also suggested that you wait until you’re completely clear after an outbreak, to engage in sexually activity again.

Unlike some STD’s, Herpes is not curable. There are certainly many over the counter and prescription medications available to manage or suppress your outbreaks, but once you’ve tested positive for the virus, you have it for life. It’s also important to note that just because you are around someone with herpes doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll get it. Remember that herpes is not an air-borne virus, so you don’t have to worry about breathing in the infection. Your risks are just higher when engaging in sexually activity in that regard. The viral shedding period does happen but at that time, the virus is not nearly as active as it would be if you were around someone who was having an outbreak.

How Do You Get Herpes?

Depending on the type of herpes, HSV-1 or HSV-2, oral or genital herpes, the herpes virus is transmitted by skin-to-skin contact. Spreading of herpes happens more often than most people realize because more than 60% of people who actually have herpes don’t realize that they do. Thus they end up spreading their dormant symptoms to other people, even if there are no sores present at the time. There are several different forms of skin to skin interaction that can result in the spreading of herpes. Listed below are the most common ways that herpes is spread so you know what to watch for in the future.

It’s said that an estimated 80% of the U.S. population has oral herpes, or HSV-1. Although many downplay their infection as mere “cold sores,” HSV-1 is by far the most common type of herpes. HSV-1 is generally present around in a person’s mouth. Naturally, the most common way to spread HSV-1 is through kissing. That’s not to say if you kiss someone who has herpes in that area, you will likely get it too, but if an outbreak is present, it increases your chances of getting it dramatically. Cold sores are a sign of herpes, but more people don’t realize that when they go to kiss someone. In addition to mouth to mouth interaction though, herpes may also be spread through oral sex, either by having herpes on the genitalia or on the mouth. Any form of skin to skin contact has the potential to transmit herpes, even if it doesn’t seem like it at the time.

When it comes to genital herpes, or HSV-1, this is commonly spread by sexual intercourse. If one sex partner has herpes around his or her genitals, he or she could give it to the partner in the midst of sexual activity. This includes both vaginal or anal intercourse, as well as oral sex. One of the biggest mistakes people make is thinking because they don’t have an active outbreak, that herpes cannot be spread. That’s simply not true. The herpes virus sheds from the skin, in what is called Asymptomatic Shedding, even when no outbreak exists. Again, a sore does not need to be present in order to spread herpes. Also, it’s important to know that condoms do not always protect you from getting herpes 100%, as it the virus may exist on areas that are not covered by a condom. Herpes cannot be transfered through latex itself, so condoms definitely offer the best protection when sexually active.

If you are worried about transmitting herpes to someone or if you think you might contract it from a partner, there are some things you can do to lessen your chances for transmission. Many couples, where one partner is infected, lead completely normal, healthy sex lives throughout their entire relationship without ever infecting one another. If you have herpes, wait several days after an outbreak before having sex as there may be some skin sheds that will still transmit the virus. Always wear a condom during sex at that will provide a barrier between sexual organs and lessen the likelihood of spreading. You might also look into medical treatments for your herpes outbreaks, especially if they are severe. Talk to your doctor about any problems that you may be having, and be sure to get tested if you think you may have contracted herpes at some point in time.